Franklin Woods Community Hospital | News Article

Monday, May 8, 2017

Dr. Trey Robertson, surgeon, always there for patients, team members

Dr. Trey Robertson

The annual Servant’s Heart Award, Mountain States’ highest honor, recognizes those among our team members – from frontline to leadership, volunteers and physicians – who display the heart of a servant by following Mountain States’ philosophy of patient-centered care and by going above and beyond the normal call of duty to help others, both at work and in the community.

 

Dr. John “Trey” Robertson, surgeon at Franklin Woods Community Hospital and Johnson City Medical Center, is a 2017 Servant’s Heart Award winner in the physician category. He was instrumental in Franklin Woods receiving designation as a Center of Excellence for minimally invasive colorectal surgery, the first of its kind in Tennessee, by The Joint Commission. He also was the first physician at Mountain States to perform fecal microbiota transplants, a cutting edge treatment that has a cure rate of 95 percent or higher for patients fighting recurrent C difficile infections.

He is always seeking more information and research to ensure he’s providing the best and most innovative care to his patients. He was a big supporter of a recent initiative to take extra steps to ensure clean scrubs when entering and exiting the operating room.

Dr. Robertson is known not just for his clinical prowess, but also for the genuine care he displays toward everyone he interacts with, both inside and outside the hospital. Patients and families, as well as co-workers, feel he truly listens to them and goes the extra mile to make sure they understand the situation, treating everyone with the same respect, from the EVS worker to the frontline nurse to the CEO.

His nomination submission stated: “One particular instance that displays his willingness to go above and beyond for his patients was in a patient who had been told by other providers that her ostomy had failed. The patient was devastated and truly felt her life was ruined. Dr. Robertson was able to listen to the patient, assess the need and perform the surgery needed to address the issues the patient had been dealing with. While it was a difficult case, Dr. Robertson followed it through to truly give this patient her life back.”

One of the wound care nurses he works with received a call that her test results showed she had breast cancer. The first place she looked for guidance was with Dr. Robertson, who saw her in his office right away and took the time to explain the results and what to expect going forward. Another nurse had lost her husband unexpectedly at a young age, and she went to Dr. Robertson for answers about the medical and autopsy report. Again, he took the time to answer questions and offer guidance.

He’s also very active in his church and in the community, offering his medical expertise whenever it’s needed. When a child collapsed at a local soccer game, Dr. Robertson provided onsite care until EMS arrived, and then he followed up with the family at the hospital to see how they were doing and if they needed anything.